Eugene Halliday

 

 I never really wanted to have to create a website always hoping someone else would do it. I did however always consistently want Eugene Hallidays blue books to be available. 

Time has passed and now I have decided to stop waiting for other people and add my own contribution on my own terms. This inspired me to write an account of my relationship with Eugene from the age of about 11 until his death. He became the most formative influence in my life and this is a small repayment to the debit of gratitude I owe. I have chosen to go an unusual route by adding much personal subjective content to my narrative, I feel somewhat awkward about this exposure but hope that others may be able to identify aspects within themselves and so find a value. Mine is a story of some difficulty, benefiting from Eugene’s mentoring but having to strike out elsewhere to find  and include what I was missing.

Richard Freeman 

 

Being - Means Actualisation

The question of the individual self is very subtle. What we call “selfishness” or “egotism” is everywhere viewed as bad, and rightly so, for the totally selfish person, the total egotist, cannot freely relate to any other being. But real life consists in free relationship. Real life requires reciprocal interplay of all forces of being.Only in such interplay can a living being activate all parts of itself; and, as we have seen, “being” means actualisation.

Every part of a living being has a specific function which is operable and meaningful only in reciprocal relation with every other part. The feet walk to carry the body and are fed from the body, the hands pick up for the body and put food in the mouth to feed the body. The digestive organs take food and change it so that it can be used for the benefit of the whole body. Everywhere in the body the cells work in relation with each other for their mutual benefit, such interworkings show clearly the nature of love.

Eugene Halliday

 

Atonement - Is At-One-Ment

Coherence of our ideas allows us to refer to a unific pattern in our consciousness. This gives us a sense of inner security; we feel at one with ourself. It is this at-one-ness that is the meaning of “atonement”. Atonement is at-one-ment. It arises in our soul when our ideas, words, feelings and deeds do not contradict each other, but fit together in perfect harmony.
It is this harmony in the soul that is referred to when we talk about the integration of the personality. The whole of our inner psychological balance depends upon such integration.

Eugene Halliday

Science - Is Aimed At The Discovery Of Principles

Principles are first things, things that were there at the very beginning of creation, things that it is better for us to know about, things that, if we know them and take heed of them, we shall the more easily survive and go on to develop our potentialities of living expression.
Science is an activity of mankind aimed at the discovery of principles, because, when principles are known and applied, life becomes more liveable, more enjoyable. Knowledge of the principles of the aerofoil enable us to design efficient aeroplanes. Knowledge of the principles of escape-velocities and other related principles allowed us to put men on the moon. The principles of rocket-propulsion have given us the power to probe interplanetary space, and allied to principles of radio-control and photography, to make beautiful pictures at close range of the rings of Saturn.
But there are not only principles of physical action, whereby we can control material things; there are also principles of mental action, of psychological and spiritual action. Noah signifies the principles that govern enlightened intelligence. These principles are the most important of all the principles we know.

Eugene Halliday

Sensation - Is The Basis Of All Our Self-Awareness

Awareness of our existence depends on finer forces than those of the gross chemical elements that constitute our lowest level of being; it depends on our capacity to sense ourselves. Sensation is the basis of all our self-awareness. The word sensation is related to the Latin word “sentire” which means “to feel”. Our ability to feel our existence is the basis of all our knowledge; hence “sentire” means not only to feel, but also to know. “Where there is no sense, there’s no feeling”. Where there is no feeling, there is no participation in life.

Eugene Halliday

Always - One Reflexive Being Has Power To Bring Order

Yogis have one supreme aim, which they call the “one-pointed-mind”. Jesus the perfect Yogi, says “I and My Father are One”. By this he means that the generative power of his being (which he calls “Father”) is one with his own free-will to be. “It is my will to do the Will of Him that sent me”, he says. There is no difference between God’s Will and the will of Jesus. In this non-difference of will is the one-pointed-mind of the Supreme Yogi.
In the presence of the One-Pointed-Mind, which is One by willing Oneness, every plurality, every multitude must bow. All multitudinous creatures must bend the knee before the Supreme Unific Being. A small quantity of rightly disciplined men can scatter a large rabble mass. A single individual with centralised will can weld a mob into a unity of military might. Always the One reflexive Being has power to bring order to the many non-reflexive masses of separatist individuals.

Eugene Halliday

Self-Acceptance - And Self-Change

Not to accept oneself as one is, is to deprive oneself of the possibility of self-change. To be unconscious of a fault is to be in a position of inability to change it. To change we must know ourselves. “Know thyself” said the Delphic Oracle, Self-knowledge is the first condition of self-change.
Without self-change there can be no improvement of the conditions of the self. To know what is within us is to be like Jesus. Most of us do not know what is within us. We have been trained as children to acquire some socially acceptable behaviour patterns. We have been conditioned to act within human society in certain ways which do not disrupt society. We have come to believe largely that we are socially adjusted and acceptable in sufficient degree to our fellow men. But underneath our garb of social acceptability we know that other forces are at work in us.
“I send you out as sheep amongst wolves”, said Jesus to his disciples, “Be ye therefore as wise as serpents and as harmless as doves”. Jesus knew what was in mankind. The creatures here mentioned are representatives of certain kinds of tendencies. The “sheep” signify our tendency to stay with the flock and follow the flock leader; the “wolves” represent the basic appetite hidden in every living being; the “serpents” are the symbols of the inherent cunning which wriggles in all creatures to pursue pleasures and avoid pains; the “doves” are emblems of the universal desire for peace and love which all beings have central to their hearts.

Eugene Halliday

Stillness - Sense Of - Holding Notion Of Eternity In Our Mind

Holding the notion of Eternity in our mind tends to bring us a sense of stillness which the notion of Time does not. The great sages of the world have held close to the idea of Eternity and by this have attained to that stillness of mind that is the mark of the sage. The man who is obsessed by the passage of time finds too little time for all the things he wants to do. He lives “on the run” passing from moment to moment in his fevered search for what he thinks he needs. The mind of the Time-conscious man is restless. The mind of the Eternity-aware man partakes of the stillness of the Eternal.
Yet although Time and Eternity are opposed, they nevertheless constitute aspects of reality. It is a fact that we see things with our senses as in a world of movement. It is also true that ideas in our mind of certain geometrical concepts do not change. Circles remain forever circles, and squares forever squares.

Eugene Halliday

XXXXXXXXXX

“Row itself, let it be sorrow; let him love it; let him pursue it, ishing for its acquisitiendum. Because he will ab hold, uniess but through concer, and also of those who resist. Now a pure snore disturbeded sum dust. He ejjnoyes, in order that somewon, also with a severe one, unless of life.

May a cusstums offficer somewon nothing of a poison-filled. Until, from a twho, twho chaffinch may also pursue it, not even a lump. But as twho, as a tank; a proverb, yeast; or else they tinscribe nor. Yet yet dewlap bed.

Who may be, let him love fellows of a polecat. Now amour, the, twhose being, drunk, yet twhitch and, an enclosed valley’s always a laugh. In acquisitiendum the Furies are Earth; in (he takes up) a lump vehicles bien.

XXXXXXXXXXX

“Row itself, let it be sorrow; let him love it; let him pursue it, ishing for its acquisitiendum. Because he will ab hold, uniess but through concer, and also of those who resist. Now a pure snore disturbeded sum dust. He ejjnoyes, in order that somewon, also with a severe one, unless of life. May a cusstums offficer somewon nothing of a poison-filled. Until, from a twho, twho chaffinch may also pursue it, not even a lump. But as twho, as a tank; a proverb, yeast; or else they tinscribe nor. Yet yet dewlap bed. Twho may be, let him love fellows of a polecat. Now amour, the, twhose being, drunk, yet twhitch and, an enclosed valley’s always a laugh. In acquisitiendum the Furies are Earth; in (he takes up) a lump vehicles bien.

EUGENE HALLIDAY DOWNLOADABLE ‘BLUE’ BOOKS

You are free to download any of the downloadable books in PDF form below.

Alternatively you can have the PDF open online for you to peruse or read by clicking the image of Eugene Halliday

Copyright notice for www.eugenehalliday.com This website and its blog content, are copyright of © Richard Freeman 2019.

The works of Eugene Halliday are copyright of © Hephzibah Yohannan 2015. All rights reserved.

Any redistribution or reproduction of part or all of the contents in any form is prohibited other than the following:

You may print or download to a local hard disk extracts for your personal and non-commercial use only

You may copy the content to individual third parties for their personal use, but only if you acknowledge the website as the source of the material, and in the case of Eugene Halliday’s works, the citation for each work

You may quote from Eugene Halliday’s works in your own written, visual or spoken work, providing that you acknowledge the source and give the citation for each work

You may not, except with our express written permission, distribute or commercially exploit the content. Nor may you transmit it or store it in any other website or other form of electronic retrieval system.

The Blue Books of which there are 15 namely:

Contributions from a Potential Corpse 1
Contributions from a Potential Corpse 2
Contributions from a Potential Corpse 3
Contributions from a Potential Corpse 4
Essays on God
Christian Philosophy volume 1
Christian Philosophy volume 2
Reflexive Self-Consciousness
The conquest of Anxiety
Defence of the Devil
The Tacit Conspiracy
Through the Bible 1
Through the Bible 2
Through the Bible 3
Through the Bible 4

All the books are hosted on this site are available to those who feel drawn to find out more. The subject matter is varied from extended essays to pithy observations. All affirm and value the will, choice and creative freedom of the individual..

Defence of the Devil

Halliday, E. (author) and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1989).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 1: Defence of the Devil
. Melchisedec Press.
ISBN 978-1-872240-00-8
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

CLICK THE IMAGE ABOVE TO READ ONLINE

Reflexive Self-Consciousness

Halliday, E. (author) and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1989).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 2: Reflexive Self-Consciousness
. Melchisedec Press. ISBN 978-1-872240-01-5
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

CLICK THE IMAGE ABOVE TO READ ONLINE

The Tacit Conspiracy

Halliday, E. (author) and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1989).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 3: The Tacit Consipiracy
. Melchisedec Press.
ISBN 978-1-872240-02-2
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

The Conquest of Anxiety

Halliday, E. (author) and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1992).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 7: The Conquest of Anxiety.
Melchisedec Press.
ISBN  978-1-872240-09-1
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

CLICK THE IMAGE ABOVE TO READ ONLINE

Essays on God

Halliday, E. (author) and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1992).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 6: Essays on God
. Melchisedec Press.
ISBN 978-1-872240-08-4
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

The Tacit Conspiracy

A profound meditation on the nature of human relationships, with the aim of saving us from misunderstanding, argument and unhappiness. It takes as its starting point the understanding that every human being is a polarised being possessing both male and female elements.

Essays on God

“Un Dieu defini est un Dieu fini.” A God defined is a God annihilated. A selection of essays from the writings of Eugene Halliday, giving an insight into his unique perspective on the concept of the Creator, ranging from “What God Cannot Do” through “God-Man, Man-God”, “God’s Body”, “God and Science”, “What is God?” to “God is Not Dead”.

The Conquest of Anxiety

Fear and anxiety are likely to affect every one of us at some point in our lives, hindering our ability to live fully and to interact well with others. In this book Eugene Halliday offers practical exercises through which we can begin to overcome this difficult state of mind and learn to live a more whole and positive life. The author places this problem within the context of a comprehensive holistic and spiritual approach to life.

In his book “The Conquest of Anxiety” Eugene Halliday deals with the fact that a state of fear and anxiety is present, to some extent, in the minds of all people of this world. Here he offers a way to overcome this negative state of mind, which, whether consciously or unconsciously, hinders our interaction with the world and our fellow human beings. He shows the underlying logic of our problem and gives practical exercises – a step by step process – which is clearly explained to the reader. This is most welcome in today’s fraught emotional, social and political climate.

Eugene Halliday’s “Collected Works”, a series of fifteen books, contain a complex of ideas set in relation to each other in such a way that a consistent and logical flow leads the reader from the beginning right through to the end of the series. This complex, based on one main leading idea to which all other ideas relate harmoniously, forms a consistent whole, as one body made of many parts.

Halliday’s books are unusual in that they deal not only with more than one idea per book, or per chapter, but even with one or more ideas per sentence. In “The Conquest of Anxiety” he sets out in the first place to define the terms which he uses in the book, thus preventing the usual confusion of undefined terms found so often in general discourse. This is most helpful for those seeking to attain a consistent state of mind, able to reflect the things of this world and of the next in their true form, where all are related to each other. For the reader who loves truth and consistency this book is a very helpful companion on the way to a truly happy life.

“Conquest of Anxiety” has been translated into German by Christian Handschug, and published as “Die Eroberung der Angst” (2017).

Christian Philosophy

“We are going to study Christian Philosophy. But before we do so, we will first shortly define the difference between Christian philosophy, philosophy in general, and science. … Christian Philosophy derives its authority, not from masses of scientific information gained by using our physical sense organs, nor from ideas assumed to be basic in the human mind. Christian philosophy rests on the words spoken by Jesus Christ. Only that philosophy which can be shown to derive logically from Christ’s words can legitimately be said to be Christian. Let us examine some of the words of Jesus and draw from them the basic truths of Christian philosophy.” Eugene Halliday.

Christian Philosophy I

Halliday, E. (author) and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1998).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 8 No 1: Christian Philosophy, Book 1.
Melchisedec Press.
ISBN  978-1-872240-16-9
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

Christian Philosophy II

Halliday, E. (author) and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (2000).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 8 No 2: Christian Philosophy, Book 2.
Melchisedec Press.
ISBN  978-1-872240-17-6
CLICK TO DOWNLOAD

Through the Bible – an Introduction

The first instalment of Through the Bible by Eugene Halliday was published in St Michael’s Church Magazine in July, 1980, and continued in monthly instalments without a break, until Part 78 in December, 1986. As Eugene Halliday died in July 1987, it is possible that Through the Bible was his last major piece of writing.

The complete series of 78 instalments was subsequently edited by David Mahlowe and published in four hardback editions as Volume 7 of the Collected Works of Eugene Halliday (The Melchisedec Press, 1994 – 1997).

Eugene Halliday employed an hermeneutic approach in writing Through the Bible. He spoke in his lectures of four levels of interpretation: literal, allegorical, homiletic (moral) and mystical.1 He said, many times, that “The Bible is a book in code”, by which he meant that it was not to be taken literally.2

Halliday defined ‘love’ as ‘working for the development of the potential of being. “God is love, and love is the will to act for the development of all beings.”3 and his Through the Bible can be taken as a guide to aid his own, as well as his readers’, personal development.

At the opening of Through the Bible, Eugene Halliday sets out his purpose for studying the books of the Bible, which is, “To clarify for ourselves our own significance and ultimate destiny within the universal plan which these scriptures outline for us.”4 He then begins at the beginning, by defining the meaning of ‘beginning’5

Throughout this series, Eugene Halliday gives his interpretations for the meaning of various stories within the Bible; The Garden of Eden; The Fall; Cain and Abel; the stories of Noah and Abraham; the Parables and life of Jesus. He defines and interprets terms such as ‘love’ and ‘joy’6; and also explains the relationship of time and eternity.7 He touches on subjects which are highly topical today, relating scientific ideas to the understanding of the relationship between spirit, mind and matter8 ; and also on parallels in other religions. For example, he explains how Hindus, Muslims, Jews and Christians find a path, “To regain our lost unity of Will.”9

Halliday ends with an explanation that “The books of the Bible have been written … in order to show man, as in a mirror, what kind of being he is, and what kind of being he may become. … Human beings are capable of all deeds of good and evil”10. He then gives definitions of the meaning of the terms ‘good’ and ‘evil’ – “The good is that which leads us towards more wholeness. The evil is that which leads us to disintegration”10 and informs us of our potential for choice.

Through the Bible could be said to be a summation of Eugene Halliday’s own ideas and teaching; but by ‘own’ he would surely say, ‘owed to the Absolute’.11

Hephzibah Yohannan, May 2011

Through the Bible I

Halliday, E. (author)
and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1994).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 7 No 1: Through the Bible, Book 1.
Melchisedec Press.
ISBN  978-1-872240-10-7
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLAOD

Through the Bible II

Halliday, E. (author)
and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1995).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 7 No 2: Through the Bible, Book 2. 
Melchisedec Press.
ISBN  978-1-872240-13-8
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

Through the Bible III

Halliday, E. (author)
and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1996).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 7 No 3: Through the Bible, Book 3.
Melchisedec Press.
ISBN  978-1-872240-14-5
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

Through the Bible IV

Halliday, E. (author)
and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1997).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 7 No 4: Through the Bible, Book 4.
Melchisedec Press.
ISBN  978-1-872240-15-2
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

Contributions from a Potential Corpse

“Contributions from a Potential Corpse” was written by Eugene Halliday between the 1950s and the 1980s. In his Foreword Halliday writes “What drives me incessantly to think, to read, to write? The will to love. Nietzsche says “the will to power”. But I say that the will to power is perverted love, and that love wills to love, and that love is work for the development of the functional potentialities of being, infinitely.” Chapter One opens with a meditation on the meaning of death containing a very positive message. The first five chapters of Book 1 are an excellent ‘primer’ of Halliday’s teaching. Subsequent sections of the book are aphoristic, a series of meditations on many topics of profound esoteric interest. Book 2 was written in the mid-1970s and contains many graphic illustrations – Halliday was an artist, and used his pen to sketch as well as to write, his diagrams clearly illuminating his writings. Book 3 opens with “Ecclesia Para Hexon”, a favourite concept of the author’s: the body of faithful souls who worship the God of gods. The second part returns to shorter aphoristic writings, the whole illustrated with diagrams. Book 4 continues in aphoristic form covering many and various topics. The four volumes are a manual of self-development for Everyman and Everywoman, a unique treasury of wisdom. David Mahlowe, Halliday’s close friend and Editor wrote “To have dwelt within the ambience of this work has been a crown experience. May it be to you, Dear Reader, as great a sourcebook of perennial wisdom as its author was and is to all who love him”.

Contributions from a Potential Corpse I

Halliday, E. (author)
and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1990).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 4 No 1: Contributions from a Potential Corpse
. Melchisedec Press.
ISBN 978-1-872240-03-9
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

Contributions from a Potential Corpse II

Halliday, E. (author)
and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1990).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 4 No 2: Contributions from a Potential Corpse
. Melchisedec Press.
ISBN 978-1-872240-04-6
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

Contributions from a Potential Corpse III

Halliday, E. (author)
and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1991).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 4 No 3: Contributions from a Potential Corpse
. Melchisedec Press.
ISBN 978-1-872240-06-0
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

Contributions from a Potential Corpse IV

Halliday, E. (author)
and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1991).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 4 No 4: Contributions from a Potential Corpse
. Melchisedec Press.
ISBN 978-1-872240-07-7
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

Copyright notice for www.eugenehalliday.com This website and its blog content, are copyright of © Richard Freeman 2019.

The works of Eugene Halliday are copyright of © Hephzibah Yohannan 2015. All rights reserved.

Any redistribution or reproduction of part or all of the contents in any form is prohibited other than the following:

You may print or download to a local hard disk extracts for your personal and non-commercial use only

You may copy the content to individual third parties for their personal use, but only if you acknowledge the website as the source of the material, and in the case of Eugene Halliday’s works, the citation for each work

You may quote from Eugene Halliday’s works in your own written, visual or spoken work, providing that you acknowledge the source and give the citation for each work

You may not, except with our express written permission, distribute or commercially exploit the content. Nor may you transmit it or store it in any other website or other form of electronic retrieval system.

The Blue Books of which there are 15 namely:

Contributions from a Potential Corpse 1
Contributions from a Potential Corpse 2
Contributions from a Potential Corpse 3
Contributions from a Potential Corpse 4
Essays on God
Christian Philosophy volume 1
Christian Philosophy volume 2
Reflexive Self-Consciousness
The conquest of Anxiety
Defence of the Devil
The Tacit Conspiracy
Through the Bible 1
Through the Bible 2
Through the Bible 3
Through the Bible 4

All the books are hosted on this site are available to those who feel drawn to find out more. The subject matter is varied from extended essays to pithy observations. All affirm and value the will, choice and creative freedom of the individual..

Defence of the Devil

Halliday, E. (author) and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1989).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 1: Defence of the Devil
. Melchisedec Press.
ISBN 978-1-872240-00-8
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

Reflexive Self-Consciousness

Halliday, E. (author) and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1989).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 2: Reflexive Self-Consciousness
. Melchisedec Press. ISBN 978-1-872240-01-5
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

The Tacit Conspiracy

Halliday, E. (author) and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1989).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 3: The Tacit Consipiracy
. Melchisedec Press.
ISBN 978-1-872240-02-2
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

The Conquest of Anxiety

Halliday, E. (author) and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1992).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 7: The Conquest of Anxiety.
Melchisedec Press.
ISBN  978-1-872240-09-1
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

Essays on God

Halliday, E. (author) and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1992).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 6: Essays on God
. Melchisedec Press.
ISBN 978-1-872240-08-4
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

The Tacit Conspiracy

A profound meditation on the nature of human relationships, with the aim of saving us from misunderstanding, argument and unhappiness. It takes as its starting point the understanding that every human being is a polarised being possessing both male and female elements.

Essays on God

“Un Dieu defini est un Dieu fini.” A God defined is a God annihilated. A selection of essays from the writings of Eugene Halliday, giving an insight into his unique perspective on the concept of the Creator, ranging from “What God Cannot Do” through “God-Man, Man-God”, “God’s Body”, “God and Science”, “What is God?” to “God is Not Dead”.

The Conquest of Anxiety

Fear and anxiety are likely to affect every one of us at some point in our lives, hindering our ability to live fully and to interact well with others. In this book Eugene Halliday offers practical exercises through which we can begin to overcome this difficult state of mind and learn to live a more whole and positive life. The author places this problem within the context of a comprehensive holistic and spiritual approach to life.

In his book “The Conquest of Anxiety” Eugene Halliday deals with the fact that a state of fear and anxiety is present, to some extent, in the minds of all people of this world. Here he offers a way to overcome this negative state of mind, which, whether consciously or unconsciously, hinders our interaction with the world and our fellow human beings. He shows the underlying logic of our problem and gives practical exercises – a step by step process – which is clearly explained to the reader. This is most welcome in today’s fraught emotional, social and political climate.

Eugene Halliday’s “Collected Works”, a series of fifteen books, contain a complex of ideas set in relation to each other in such a way that a consistent and logical flow leads the reader from the beginning right through to the end of the series. This complex, based on one main leading idea to which all other ideas relate harmoniously, forms a consistent whole, as one body made of many parts.

Halliday’s books are unusual in that they deal not only with more than one idea per book, or per chapter, but even with one or more ideas per sentence. In “The Conquest of Anxiety” he sets out in the first place to define the terms which he uses in the book, thus preventing the usual confusion of undefined terms found so often in general discourse. This is most helpful for those seeking to attain a consistent state of mind, able to reflect the things of this world and of the next in their true form, where all are related to each other. For the reader who loves truth and consistency this book is a very helpful companion on the way to a truly happy life.

“Conquest of Anxiety” has been translated into German by Christian Handschug, and published as “Die Eroberung der Angst” (2017).

Christian Philosophy

“We are going to study Christian Philosophy. But before we do so, we will first shortly define the difference between Christian philosophy, philosophy in general, and science. … Christian Philosophy derives its authority, not from masses of scientific information gained by using our physical sense organs, nor from ideas assumed to be basic in the human mind. Christian philosophy rests on the words spoken by Jesus Christ. Only that philosophy which can be shown to derive logically from Christ’s words can legitimately be said to be Christian. Let us examine some of the words of Jesus and draw from them the basic truths of Christian philosophy.” Eugene Halliday.

Christian Philosophy I

Halliday, E. (author) and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1998).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 8 No 1: Christian Philosophy, Book 1.
Melchisedec Press.
ISBN  978-1-872240-16-9
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

Christian Philosophy II

Halliday, E. (author) and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (2000).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 8 No 2: Christian Philosophy, Book 2.
Melchisedec Press.
ISBN  978-1-872240-17-6
CLICK TO DOWNLOAD

Through the Bible – an Introduction

The first instalment of Through the Bible by Eugene Halliday was published in St Michael’s Church Magazine in July, 1980, and continued in monthly instalments without a break, until Part 78 in December, 1986. As Eugene Halliday died in July 1987, it is possible that Through the Bible was his last major piece of writing.

The complete series of 78 instalments was subsequently edited by David Mahlowe and published in four hardback editions as Volume 7 of the Collected Works of Eugene Halliday (The Melchisedec Press, 1994 – 1997).

Eugene Halliday employed an hermeneutic approach in writing Through the Bible. He spoke in his lectures of four levels of interpretation: literal, allegorical, homiletic (moral) and mystical.1 He said, many times, that “The Bible is a book in code”, by which he meant that it was not to be taken literally.2

Halliday defined ‘love’ as ‘working for the development of the potential of being. “God is love, and love is the will to act for the development of all beings.”3 and his Through the Bible can be taken as a guide to aid his own, as well as his readers’, personal development.

At the opening of Through the Bible, Eugene Halliday sets out his purpose for studying the books of the Bible, which is, “To clarify for ourselves our own significance and ultimate destiny within the universal plan which these scriptures outline for us.”4 He then begins at the beginning, by defining the meaning of ‘beginning’5

Throughout this series, Eugene Halliday gives his interpretations for the meaning of various stories within the Bible; The Garden of Eden; The Fall; Cain and Abel; the stories of Noah and Abraham; the Parables and life of Jesus. He defines and interprets terms such as ‘love’ and ‘joy’6; and also explains the relationship of time and eternity.7 He touches on subjects which are highly topical today, relating scientific ideas to the understanding of the relationship between spirit, mind and matter8 ; and also on parallels in other religions. For example, he explains how Hindus, Muslims, Jews and Christians find a path, “To regain our lost unity of Will.”9

Halliday ends with an explanation that “The books of the Bible have been written … in order to show man, as in a mirror, what kind of being he is, and what kind of being he may become. … Human beings are capable of all deeds of good and evil”10. He then gives definitions of the meaning of the terms ‘good’ and ‘evil’ – “The good is that which leads us towards more wholeness. The evil is that which leads us to disintegration”10 and informs us of our potential for choice.

Through the Bible could be said to be a summation of Eugene Halliday’s own ideas and teaching; but by ‘own’ he would surely say, ‘owed to the Absolute’.11

Hephzibah Yohannan, May 2011

Through the Bible I

Halliday, E. (author)
and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1994).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 7 No 1: Through the Bible, Book 1.
Melchisedec Press.
ISBN  978-1-872240-10-7
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLAOD

Through the Bible II

Halliday, E. (author)
and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1995).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 7 No 2: Through the Bible, Book 2.
Melchisedec Press.
ISBN  978-1-872240-13-8
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

Through the Bible III

Halliday, E. (author)
and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1996).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 7 No 3: Through the Bible, Book 3.
Melchisedec Press.
ISBN  978-1-872240-14-5
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

Through the Bible IV

Halliday, E. (author)
and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1997).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 7 No 4: Through the Bible, Book 4.
Melchisedec Press.
ISBN  978-1-872240-15-2
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

Contributions from a Potential Corpse

“Contributions from a Potential Corpse” was written by Eugene Halliday between the 1950s and the 1980s. In his Foreword Halliday writes “What drives me incessantly to think, to read, to write? The will to love. Nietzsche says “the will to power”. But I say that the will to power is perverted love, and that love wills to love, and that love is work for the development of the functional potentialities of being, infinitely.” Chapter One opens with a meditation on the meaning of death containing a very positive message. The first five chapters of Book 1 are an excellent ‘primer’ of Halliday’s teaching. Subsequent sections of the book are aphoristic, a series of meditations on many topics of profound esoteric interest. Book 2 was written in the mid-1970s and contains many graphic illustrations – Halliday was an artist, and used his pen to sketch as well as to write, his diagrams clearly illuminating his writings. Book 3 opens with “Ecclesia Para Hexon”, a favourite concept of the author’s: the body of faithful souls who worship the God of gods. The second part returns to shorter aphoristic writings, the whole illustrated with diagrams. Book 4 continues in aphoristic form covering many and various topics. The four volumes are a manual of self-development for Everyman and Everywoman, a unique treasury of wisdom. David Mahlowe, Halliday’s close friend and Editor wrote “To have dwelt within the ambience of this work has been a crown experience. May it be to you, Dear Reader, as great a sourcebook of perennial wisdom as its author was and is to all who love him”.

Contributions from a Potential Corpse I

Halliday, E. (author)
and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1990).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 4 No 1: Contributions from a Potential Corpse
. Melchisedec Press.
ISBN 978-1-872240-03-9
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

Contributions from a Potential Corpse II

Halliday, E. (author)
and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1990).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 4 No 2: Contributions from a Potential Corpse
. Melchisedec Press.
ISBN 978-1-872240-04-6
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

Contributions from a Potential Corpse III

Halliday, E. (author)
and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1991).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 4 No 3: Contributions from a Potential Corpse
. Melchisedec Press.
ISBN 978-1-872240-06-0
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD

Contributions from a Potential Corpse IV

Halliday, E. (author)
and Mahlowe, D. (editor) (1991).
The collected works of Eugene Halliday,
Vol 4 No 4: Contributions from a Potential Corpse
. Melchisedec Press.
ISBN 978-1-872240-07-7
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD